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Workshop "Derivators"

created by daniele on 09 Jan 2019

9 apr 2019 - 12 apr 2019

Regensburg

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Dear colleagues,

this is a second announcement of the workshop on

Derivators

to be held at the University of Regensburg during April 9-12, 2019.

Derivators were introduced by Grothendieck in "Pursuing stacks" as the structure of homotopy categories, in order to encode the coherence properties of homotopy limits and colimits. This meeting aims to bring together people interested in the theory of derivators and its applications, and to discuss current research directions in the area: from the relation with the theory of infinity-categories to applications in algebraic geometry and in representation theory.

The current list of confirmed speakers is:

Paul Balmer (UCLA)
Falk Beckert (University of Wuppertal)
Kevin Carlson (UCLA)
Denis-Charles Cisinski (University of Regensburg)
Daniel Fuentes-Keuthan (Johns Hopkins University)
Martin Gallauer (University of Oxford)
Fritz Hörmann (University of Freiburg)
Magdalena Kedziorek (Utrecht University)
Tobias Lenz (University of Bonn)
Fosco Loregian (Masaryk University, Brno)
Irakli Patchkoria (University of Aberdeen)
George Raptis (University of Regensburg)
Martina Rovelli (Johns Hopkins University)

All interested to participate in the Workshop should register via the website:

https://www-app.uni-regensburg.de/Fakultaeten/MAT/sfb-higher-invariants/index.php/Derivators

indicating if they would like to give a talk and if they request financial support. (The deadline for registrations requesting financial support is January 20, 2019.)

Best wishes,

The organisers

Denis-Charles Cisinski (Regensburg)
George Raptis (Regensburg)

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